An explanation...

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This past week I deleted a comment because its author misrepresented what my father had said in a piece titled, "Lord, Raise Up a Negro Prophet," that was published in Eternity magazine back in October 1961. The writer of the comment found my father's article here on our blog in our archives by subject under the entry, "Race."

From the comment I deleted, here's what my father was said to have written:

Tim's own father said back in 1965 that the gross immorality and incredible levels of violence among Negroes (his own word) were the main reasons most white people didn't like them.

And here's what my father actually wrote:

I know that social change is accomplished one step at a time. I know, too, that God delivered His people from Egypt before He gave the Divine Law. But today we are not in the darkness of pre-Revelation. We have the Light of our Lord Jesus Christ. And Christian morality has never, to my knowledge, waited for social betterment. Those slaves (white) on the Island of Crete, about whom St. Paul wrote to Titus, were expected to influence their masters by their personal morality (Titus 2:9,10)-not by their demands for equality. And I sense that a significant decrease in the number of Negro births out of wedlock, in the number of unwed Negro mothers on the relief rolls, in the number of Negro youths embroiled in delinquency, a significant improvement in Negro morality would do more to change the climate of white opinion toward Negroes than all the pressure groups can ever achieve.

So my father said that a "significant improvement in Negro morality would do more to change the climate of white opinion toward Negroes than all the pressure groups can ever achieve," but the author of the comment reported my father as saying about Negroes that their "gross immorality and incredible levels of violence were the main reasons most white people didn't like them."

To suggest a likely remedy for a problem is not to explain the problem's origin, nor is it to justify the problem's existence in the first place. But reading the summary of my father's statement, an uninformed reader would think my father had claimed that "most white people didn't like Negroes," and that white people were justified in not liking Negroes because it was Negro gross immorality and incredible levels of violence that had led whites not to like Negroes...

So, after I deleted the comment for misrepresenting my father's statements, the racists posted an article on their blog with the headline, "Tim Bayly is a liar who's ashamed of his own father." And in the post, they said this:

I ...found out just how dishonest and mendacious Tim Bayly is. It seems he's ashamed of his father, who was a fairly prominent Judeochristian writer-one of the books he wrote is The Gospel Blimp, which poked fun at "relevant" types, and he was a columnist for Eternity magazine. You'd think Bayly would be proud of him, but when someone dared mentioned what his father said about Negroes 40 years ago, Bayly banned him, deleted the comment, and lied about him, accusing him of "misrepresenting" his father's views... Joseph Bayly clearly said those things. And Tim Bayly lied about it, and slandered a person for speaking the truth.

Tim Bayly is deeply ashamed of his late father. So ashamed that he resorts to lies to cover up the shame he feels.

Well no, I'm not ashamed of my father at all. The article under debate has resided here on our blog for many months now, and anyone reading it will quickly see that it bears no resemblance to an apologetic for racism or white supremacism. Dad wasn't justifying white racism. Rather, he was calling for a Negro prophet to stand up and call his people to repentance for their sins. And he thought that the repentance of Negroes for their sins of violence and immorality might well lead whites to repent for their sins of hatred and racism.

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